Chester Beatty Library at Dublin Castle

October 18, 2017

Today concludes our Emerald Tour of Ireland, and was a day of “free time” for our group. Some of us included a visit to the Dublin Castle, because here the Chester Beatty Library is located. Among the interesting collections there are some of the very earliest New Testament texts, dating to c.AD 200.

Johnny Felker & Leon Mauldin at Chester Beatty Library. Photo by Martha Felker.

Photos are not permitted inside the exhibition.

Some info re: the New Testament manuscripts:

There are three New Testament manuscripts that are part of the Chester Beatty Papyri. The first, P. I, is labeled under the Gregory-Aland numbering system as P45 and was originally a codex of 110 leaves that contained the four canonical gospels and Acts. 30 fragmentary leaves remain, consisting of two small leaves of the Gospel of Matthew chapters 20/21 and 25/26, portions of the Gospel of Mark chapters 4-9, 11-12, portions of the Gospel of Luke 6-7, 9-14, portions of the Gospel of John 4-5, 10-11, and portion of the Acts of the Apostles 4-17. The ordering of the gospels follows the Western tradition, Matthew, John, Luke, Mark, Acts. These fragments are palaeographically dated to the first half of the 3rd century.

P46 is the second New Testament manuscript in the Chester Beatty collection (P. II), and was a codex that contained the Pauline Epistles dating c. 200.[citation needed] What remains today of the manuscript is roughly 85 out of 104 leaves consisting of Romans chapters 5-6, 8-15, all of Hebrews, Ephesians, Galatians, Philippians, Colossians, virtually all of 1–2 Corinthians and 1 Thessalonians 1-2, 5. The leaves have partially deteriorated, resulting in the loss of some lines at the bottom of each folio. The manuscript split up between the Chester Beatty Library and the University of Michigan. Scholars do not believe the Pastoral epistles were included originally in the codex, based on the amount of space required in the missing leaves; they conclude 2 Thessalonians would have occupied the final portion of the codex. The inclusion of Hebrews, a book that was questioned canonically and not considered authored by Paul, is notable. The placement of it following Romans is unique against most other witnesses, as is the ordering of Galatians following Ephesians.

P. III is the last New Testament manuscript, P47, and contains 10 leaves from the Book of Revelation, chapters 9-17. This manuscript also dates to the 3rd century, and Kenyon describes the handwriting as being rough (Wikipedia).

It’s been a great tour.

From the Chester Beatty Library Brochure.

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Touring Ireland: W.B. Yeats Grave at Drumcliffe Graveyard

October 16, 2017

Irish poet W. B. Yeats chose the churchyard at Drumcliffe in County Sligo as his final resting place, located at the foot of Benbulben mountain. Yeats died in France but he wished to be buried at this location.

Grave of poet W. B. Yeats, Drumcliffe Graveyard, near Sligo, Ireland. Photo by Leon Mauldin.

Under bare Ben Bulben’s head In Drumcliff churchyard Yeats is laid. An ancestor was rector there Long years ago, a church stands near, By the road an ancient cross. No marble, no conventional phrase; On limestone quarried near the spot By his command these words are cut: Cast a cold eye On life, on death. Horseman, pass by! (W. B. Yeats, “Under Ben Bulben”)

St Columba’s Church of Ireland in Drumcliff. Built in 1809. Photo by Leon Mauldin.

Thanks for following our Emerald Ireland Tour. Tomorrow we are to make our way on to Dublin.

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Killary Fjord in North Connemara, Ireland

October 14, 2017

Today we visited the Connemara loop, which included the Killary Fjord among several other interesting sites. Here we were able to view from a distance the Killary Fjord Shellfish operation, where they farm blue-shell mussels on longlines submerged 8 meters under water. The Blue mussel (Mytulis edulis), is a species native to Irish waters, and is one of the main species cultivated by the Irish aquaculture Industry.

Killary Fjord, Ireland. Photo by Leon Mauldin.

Killary Harbour/An Caoláire Rua is a fjord located in the west of Ireland in the heart of Connemara which forms a natural border between counties Galway and Mayo. It is 16 kilometres long and in the centre over 45 metres deep. It is one of three glacial fjords that exist in Ireland, the others being Lough Swilly and Carlingford Lough.
On its northern shore lies the mountain of Mweelrea, Connacht’s highest mountain, rising to 814 metres. To the south rise the Maumturk Mountains and the Twelve Bens. The area contains some of Ireland’s most awe-inspiring and dramatic scenery. (Wikipedia)

Killary Fjord. Photo by Leon Mauldin.

Thanks for following our travels in Ireland. Click images for larger view.


Touring Ireland (cont’d) Galway Cathedral; Remembering J. F. Kennedy

October 13, 2017

Continuing our tour of Ireland today we saw thatched roof houses at Adare, then the scenic “Cliffs of Moher,” and then on to Galway, concluding with a brief stop at the Galway Cathedral.

I found it interesting that inside the cathedral in the Mortuary Chapel there was a mosaic of President John F. Kennedy (by Patrick Pollen).

Mosaic of President John F. Kennedy, Galway Cathedral, Galway, Ireland. Photo by Leon Mauldin.

President John F. Kennedy visited Ireland June 26-29, 1963, five months before his assassination. That visit included Galway (June 29, 1963), where we are tonight. Every indication is that his visit was well received by the Irish people. There is an amazing amount of video documentation (YouTube) of his 4 day visit to Ireland, including here (Galway).

Galway Cathedral, Galway, Ireland. Photo by Leon Mauldin.

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Touring in Ireland

October 12, 2017

Today was Day 3 of our Ireland Tour which has taken us from Dublin to Glendalough, Waterford, Blarney, and now Killarney, where we today have taken the 109 mile Ring of Kerry, encircling the Iveragh peninsula. Today we began with a brief stop at St. Mary’s Cathedral in Killarney.

St. Mary’s Cathedral at Killarney, Ireland.

 

Killarney is home to St Mary’s, a beautiful Gothic-style building that serves as the cathedral of the Catholic Diocese of Kerry. Previously, St Brendan’s at Ardfert was the diocese’s cathedral.

English architect Augustus Pugin, who worked on the iconic Palace of Westminster, designed St Mary’s with a rugged exterior and smooth, light-filled interior.

The cathedral was consecrated in 1855 and renovated in the 1970s. (https://www.discoverireland.ie/Arts-Culture-Heritage/st-mary-s-catholic-church-killarney/50303)