Athens Temple of Themis

Many of the sites in ancient Athens are world renown. The Parthenon, for example, was one of the Seven Wonders of the World (see our previous post here).

Other sites are not as well known. Looking down the south slope of the acropolis you can see the remains of the small temple of Themis, seen here at center of photo.

Temple of Themis in Athens, Greece. Photo by Leon Mauldin.

Temple of Themis in Athens, Greece. Photo by Leon Mauldin.

In Greek mythology,

Themis was the Titan goddess of divine law and order–the traditional rules of conduct first established by the gods. She was also a prophetic goddess who presided over the most ancient oracles, including Delphoi. In this role, she was the divine voice (themistes) who first instructed mankind in the primal laws of justice and morality, such as the precepts of piety, the rules of hospitality, good governance, conduct of assembly, and pious offerings to the gods. In Greek, the word themis referred to divine law, those rules of conduct long established by custom. Unlike the word nomos, the term was not usually used to describe laws of human decree.

Themis was an early bride of Zeus and his first counsellor. She was often represented seated beside his throne advising him on the precepts of divine law and the rules of fate.

Themis was closely identified with Demeter Thesmophoros (“Bringer of Law”). Indeed Themis’ six children, the spring-time Horai and death-bringing Moirai, reflect the dual-functions of Demeter’s own daughter Persephone. Themis was also identified with Gaia (Earth) especially in the role of the oracular voice of earth. http://www.theoi.com/Titan/TitanisThemis.html

This temple is mentioned by Pausanias (ca. AD 110-180), a Greek traveler and geographer, in his Description of Greece. This lengthy work describes ancient Greece from firsthand observations. His brief notation on this temple was, “After the sanctuary of Asclepius, as you go by this way towards the Acropolis, there is a temple of Themis.”
We have several other posts on ancient Athenian temple and other sites, here, here and here. Use the search box at top of home page. Click image for larger view.
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